Fan hitch design harnessing involves hooking the dog team into one ring that is connected to the sled. The fan was used on open terrain where there were no trees. But, without trees, there was no way to anchor the lead and wheel dogs while harnessing the team. Inevitably, they would loop bac…

During the early 1990s, we’d moved from our remote homestead up the Tanana to our downriver house so that our two younger children could go to school at Whitestone. We had two horses and lived in Big Delta. Up the road at Hansen Hollow, Irene Mead often took her horse for a ride. We three we…

“Overflow!" The word strikes alarm to the musher's heart. Throughout the winter, subterranean water seeks release, oozing over the edges of the frozen waterways and creating stratifications of ice. Masked by fluffy snow and appearing even in the extreme cold, the icy water lies beneath the s…

When we first built our home upriver with its sweeping view of the Tanana and the Alaska Range, I remarked to my electric friend, Diane Hansen, "Now, I can sit on my porch and watch the Tanana change with every season." Not interested in such passivity at age 26, Diane dryly remarked, "Oh, wow."

We have always been creative in our Christmas gifts. That approach came from being perennially broke trappers who also preferred making crafts to shopping. When we were raising our family in our isolated Tanana River home 1973-1986, we celebrated Christmas for a month. The winter of 1976, wh…

In the fall of 1974 my husband, Reb, four-year-old son Clint, and I walked to our first trap cabin, Campbell’s, to cut firewood for the winter season. The guys stacked firewood while I scooped frozen cranberries with a bear claw.

I very much appreciate the opportunity to research and share the history of Delta with you. I have lived in the Big Delta area for almost 50 years. When I was young in the late 1960s-1970s, I bonded with our area and those pioneers who made Delta what it is today. I enjoy interviewing the ad…

Fan hitch design harnessing involves hooking the dog team into one ring that is connected to the sled. The fan was used on open terrain where there were no trees. But, without trees, there was no way to anchor the lead and wheel dogs while harnessing the team. Inevitably, they would loop bac…

During the early 1990s, we’d moved from our remote homestead up the Tanana to our downriver house so that our two younger children could go to school at Whitestone. We had two horses and lived in Big Delta. Up the road at Hansen Hollow, Irene Mead often took her horse for a ride. We three we…

‘There’s no such thing as bad weather, just bad gear’ – Trapping with Ben

“Overflow!" The word strikes alarm to the musher's heart. Throughout the winter, subterranean water seeks release, oozing over the edges of the frozen waterways and creating stratifications of ice. Masked by fluffy snow and appearing even in the extreme cold, the icy water lies beneath the s…

Nancy Lord and David James, who contribute book reviews to the We Alaskans section of the Anchorage Daily News, have recognized the second volume of "Windows to the Land" by local writer Judy Ferguson as a most memorable book of 2016.

When we first built our home upriver with its sweeping view of the Tanana and the Alaska Range, I remarked to my electric friend, Diane Hansen, "Now, I can sit on my porch and watch the Tanana change with every season." Not interested in such passivity at age 26, Diane dryly remarked, "Oh, wow."

We have always been creative in our Christmas gifts. That approach came from being perennially broke trappers who also preferred making crafts to shopping. When we were raising our family in our isolated Tanana River home 1973-1986, we celebrated Christmas for a month. The winter of 1976, wh…

In the fall of 2015, Reb and I stopped at Mervin Gilbertson’s home in Fairbanks. He and his wife Jenny warmly invited us to join them, Dale Fett and Mervin’s cousin Barbara Green for dinner. For a couple of hours over Fred Meyer fried chicken, we got to hear hair-raising tales of early wagin…

In the fall of 2015, Reb and I stopped in at Mervin Gilbertson’s home in Fairbanks. He and his wife, Jenny, warmly invited us to join them, Dale Fett, and Mervin’s cousin Barbara Green for dinner. For a couple of hours over Fred Meyer fried chicken, we got to hear hair-raising tales of early…

When I first came to Delta in 1968, the oldest of the nine Fett children, Larry Fett, was a friend of our close friend Charlie Boyd, a trapper and big game guide. We all called Larry “Chester,” a nickname coined from Gunsmoke’s Matt Dillon’s deputy. Larry may’ve had a temporary bum leg like …

In the fall of 1974 my husband, Reb, four-year-old son Clint, and I walked to our first trap cabin, Campbell’s, to cut firewood for the winter season. The guys stacked firewood while I scooped frozen cranberries with a bear claw.

I very much appreciate the opportunity to research and share the history of Delta with you. I have lived in the Big Delta area for almost 50 years. When I was young in the late 1960s-1970s, I bonded with our area and those pioneers who made Delta what it is today. I enjoy interviewing the ad…

To the 75th anniversary of the construction of the Alcan Highway in 2017 (see http://ouralaskahighway.com) and with Delta Junction the terminus of the Alaska Highway, we dedicate the following Corky Sager series. 

To celebrate Delta Junction’s 50-year anniversary as a city, a series presenting our pioneers will run throughout 2010.